Graduate Theological Union

Courses

Upcoming Courses:

CJS Fall 2014

 

Deena Aranoff

BSHR-3700: Hebrew: Post Biblical Readings.

In this course we will examine selections from post-Biblical Hebrew writings. We will focus on the Hebrew exegetical works to emerge in the rabbinic and medieval periods. The primary goal of the class will be to comfortable reading post-Biblical Hebrew texts that are viewed as central to the Jewish exegetical corpus.

Tuesday, 9:40am to 12:30pm, GTU Hedco Room, 2465 LeConte Road.

 

HSHR-4502: Jewish Mysticism.

This course will examine the ideas, narratives, theologies and practices that have been part of Jewish mysticism through the ages. We will proceed chronologically and thematically, exploring the variety of Jewish mystical trends as well as themes such as language, hermeneutics, gender, sexual imagery, nomian and anti-nomian emphases, messianism, symbolism and ritual practices. We will consider the relationship between Jewish mysticism and surrounding religious systems as well as relationships between Jewish mysticism and other Jewish communal and rabbinic structures. This course is designed for doctoral students

Monday, 9:40am to 12:30pm, GTU Hedco Room, 2465 LeConte Road.

 

Rachel Brodie

Jewishing: An On-Going Conversation about Doing and Being Jewish 

This course is an exploration of Judaism not as a monolith of static concepts and practices but as a dynamic system of choices and questions.  Listen and talk, read and write, sing and eat your way into questions of Jewish identity, seeing through a Jewish lens, and living among Jews in the Bay Area in the twenty-first century. Offered as an alternative approach to “Introduction to Judaism,” the course makes us of the methodology commonly referred to as the “flipped classroom.” Rather than focus on conveying information in order to "cover the basics" the course is conceived of as an on-going conversation where students can take what they are reading and observing, wondering and questioning and unpack it together as a group. Tuesdays 11:30am-1:30pm. Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, SF, CA 94706.

 

Stephen Pearce

LSHS-4130: Sacred Connections.

This course will focus on the symbolism, performance and rituals of the Jewish life and holiday cycles. Probing venerated texts and interpretations-ancient to contemporary-students will gain deeper insight into the development of formal and informal rites: birth, coming-of-age initiation, marriage and death. In addition, the foundations and enhancements of festivals and minor holidays and their adaptation to the changing times and circumstances will deepen an understanding of the origins and transformative nature of observance.

Thursday, 9:40am to 12:30pm, Pacific School of Religion, Mudd Building, Room 206, 1798 Scenic Avenue.

 

Naomi Seidman

HSST-2024: Modern/Contemporary Jewish Thought.

This course will examine Jewish intellectual history from the beginnings of the modern era until our own time, setting each intellectual development into its appropriate historical or cultural context. Topics we will cover include Haskalah, Hasidism, Zionism, Holocaust theology and feminism. Figures we will cover include Spinoza, Mendelssohn, Glükl of Hameln, Maimon, Herzl, Buber, Heschel, Levinas, and Plaskow. This course fulfills the requirement for a survey course in modern Jewish history or thought.

Monday, 2:10-5:00pm, Pacific School of Religion, Mudd Building,  Room 101, 1798 Scenic Avenue.

 

HRHS-3704: The Jewish City.

This course will explore the intersection between urban studies and modern Jewish history, with a particular focus on Vilna, Berlin, New York, TelAviv, Jerusalem and Marrakech as Jewish spaces.We will read history, memoirs, travelogues, poetry, architectural studies, sociology and other genres.

Tuesday, 2:10-5:00pm, Pacific School of Religion, Mudd Building, Room 101, 1798 Scenic Avenue.

 

CJS Spring 2015

Deena Aranoff

HSST 2022: Ancient/Medieval Jewish Civilization

The seminar will examine ancient and medieval Jewish history as well as the critical-historical methodology that often shapes such an inquiry. We will explore Jewish civilization from its beginnings in ancient Israel through the medieval period and will conclude the seminar with a discussion of more recent attempts to characterize Judaism (and religion more generally) in light of modern, historicist critique. Time: Monday 9:40am-12:30pm. Location TBD.

 

HSHR 5190: Medieval Jewish Philosophy

This course will examine Jewish philosophical trends from the tenth through the fifteenth centuries. We will examine the Aristotelian and neo-Platonic trends that were prominent in the Islamic cultural context and the ways in which these notions profoundly shaped the Jewish ideas of the period. Some questions that will emerge as part of our studies are: What is the definition of Jewish philosophy? What kinds of questions occupied Jewish philosophers in the medieval period? How did religion and philosophy combine to address these questions and how did they clash? The course will examine the impact of philosophical notions upon two particular aspects of Jewish intellectual life: mysticism and Biblical hermeneutics. Tuesday 9:40am-12:30pm. Location TBD

 

Ashley Bacchi

BSHS-4516: Second Temple Representations of Biblical Women

This course will offer a framework on ways to assess women and gender in the Second Temple Period. Examining how Hellenistic authors mold representations of biblical women gives insight into their conceptions of the ideal woman as well as the place of women in Jewish history. Hellenistic discourse on women and gender is grounded in biblical interpretation and everyday life and, as such, has the potential to shed light on the tumultuous debate between what may be deemed problematic, acceptable, ideal, and anomalous in respect to women's behavior. Thursday, 2:10-5:00pm, Pacific School of Religion, Mudd Building,  Room 101, 1798 Scenic Avenue.

 

Rachel Brodie

“Jewishing”: An On-Going Conversation about Doing and Being Jewish 

This course is an exploration of Judaism not as a monolith of static concepts and practices but as a dynamic system of choices and questions.  Listen and talk, read and write, sing and eat your way into questions of Jewish identity, seeing through a Jewish lens, and living among Jews in the Bay Area in the twenty-first century. Tuesdays 11:30am-1:30pm.
Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California Street, SF, CA 94706.

 

Naomi Seidman (with Dr. Munir Jiwa of GTU's Center for Islamic Studies)

HR-2041: Gender in Judaism and Islam

This course will explore women, gender roles, marriage and related questions in Judaism and Islam, studying the primary sources as well as modern developments, contemporary critical debates, anthropological views, and media representations. The course will be co-taught and bring in experts in both Judaism and Islam. Students are expected to participate in the Day of Learning around this issue, to be held on a Sunday afternoon in the spring semester.
Mondays 6:10-9:40pm,  Pacific School of Religion, Mudd Building,  Room 102 1798 Scenic Avenue.

 

Harley Jay Siksin

HS-3736: Medieval Ashkenaz

The course explores the construction of Jewish identity in the medieval Rhineland, more familiarly known as Ashkenaz. We will examine the cultural space of Askenazi Jews in the domains of school, family, literary production, as well as the dynamics of Christian-Jewish relationships. Discussion format based on required weekly readings. Additional assignments: 3 short response papers and a longer, final paper based on topics and readings outlined in the syllabus. Tuesday 2:10-5:00pm. Pacific School of Religion, Mudd Building,  Room 206, 1798 Scenic Avenue.

 

Previous Courses:

CJS Spring 2014

Ancient-Medieval Jewish Civilization
Dr. Deena Aranoff, Graduate Theological Union

Course ID: HSST-2022          Monday, 9:40AM-12:30PM                       Location: Hedco at GTU This course will examine Jewish civilization from its beginnings in ancient Israel through its development in medieval times. We will examine features of Jewish communal life, as well as the intellectual and religious currents among Jews in the ancient and medieval periods. This course will provide an understanding of the continuities and discontinuities in Jewish history and the overall process of cultural change in Judaism. This course is required for all M.A. and Certificate students at CJS. Weekly response papers/Final Exam.

Gender and Talmud
Charlotte Fonrobert, Stanford University, Visiting Professor of Rabbinics at CJS at the Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: HRBS-4351          Wednesday, 9:40AM-12:30PM          Location: CDSP-113

This course will explore the construction of gender in the Talmud through close readings of significant legal passages in the treatment of women, marriage & gender. We will supplement this analysis of primary sources by reading in gender theory, both within & outside the field of rabbinics. Hebrew/Aramaic reading ability required.

Hellenism, Judaism, and Empire
Ashley Bacchi, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: BSHS-3735               Thursday, 2:10PM-5:00PM                Location: CDSP-116

This course will explore questions of Jewish identity before and after the Maccabean Revolt. Students will be introduced to primary sources and recent scholarship concerning the interaction between Judaism and Hellenism in order to evaluate how both acceptance and rejection fostered transformation. This course will help students interested in Hebrew Bible and/or the New Testament illuminate what some scholars have described as the "Intertestamental" period. Gender, art, and archeology are some lenses this course will use in an attempt to gain insight into this diverse yet integrated time. Advanced MDiv, Masters, and Doctoral students interested in gaining an understanding of the style, content, and context of Jewish writings in the Hellenistic age. This literature is not confined to one perspective, and as such, exposes students to a wide spectrum of interpretations on Biblical literature and Jewish culture that can and were operating simultaneously. Seminar: class presentation; final research paper. All readings in English. Basic knowledge of Hebrew Bible required in order to appreciate what is being imitated as well as created. This course is taught by PhD student Ashley Bacchi with a Newhall Award, under the supervision of Dr. Deena Aranoff.

Love & Sex in Modern Jewish Literature
Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: RA-2217              Thursdays, 9:40AM-12:30PM                  Location: MUDD-204

The emergence of modern Jewish literature in the nineteenth century was accompanied by the secularization and Westernization of traditional Jewish marital structures, erotic practices, and gender roles. Modern Jewish literature both reflected and shaped these transformations, serving as a site for the negotiation of traditional and modern values around love and sex. We will trace this journey from the Haskalah to contemporary Jewish American and Israeli narrative prose; readings include Sholem Aleichem, Isaac Bashevis Singer, S.Y. Agnon, and Grace Paley. All literature will be provided in the original and English translation. Seminar/final paper required, no prerequisites.

Politics of Biblical Translation
Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: BSHR-4530    Mondays, 2:10PM-5:00PM        Location: Hedco

This course will follow the career of Bible translation from the composition of the  Septuagint to contemporary missionary translations. We will study translations narratives using post-colonialist theories to analyze the politics of cross-cultural transmission. Jewish, Christian and Islamic approaches to translation will be contrasted. All texts will be available in English translation. Seminar/ final paper.

The Power of Narrative and Metaphor as a Platform for Teaching, Writing, and Personal Development    
Dr. Stephen S. Pearce, Visiting Professor
Course ID: TBD           Time: Tuesdays 9:40AM-12:30PM              Location: TBD

This course focuses on the transformative and redemptive capacity of narrative and metaphor: charter myths, folk traditions, religious legends and sacred texts, mythology, drama, poetry, saga, paradox and humor.  When properly understood, narrative in all its forms enriches cultural and religious understanding and the transfer of knowledge from one context to another, while circumventing resistance to old and new ideas.  Drawing on Jewish, non-Jewish and secular sources, students will employ a close reading of texts for an expansive understanding of the life cycle, ritual and holiday occasions, worship and the ever-changing landscape of American religious life, and will thus learn to incorporate the oldest, deeply-embedded ways of understanding human consciousness and motives into academic, congregational and personal work. 

Additional Jewish Studies Courses at the GTU

Jewish Art and Politics
Rene'e Powell, Center for Arts and Religion
Course ID: RA- 1145      Thursdays, 2:40PM-5:00PM                    Location: MUDD 102

How many ways has art been used to shape our perceptions? This course will examine how visual images have been used as a vehicle to influence our views of social and political ideology. We will analyze both visual and literary interpretations of the art work with the intention of finding new insights about the rich cultural history of Judaism. The course will also examine how the fascist regime systematically used modern art to build Hitler’s political campaign which attacked race and culture.

Jews, Christians and Muslims: Conflicts & Interactions 1400-1600
Dr. Christopher Ocker, Professor of Church History, San Francisco Theological Seminary
Course ID: HSHR-4801/HSHR-5801   Tuesdays, 2:10PM – 5PM    Location: GTU (Room TBD)

The seminar will examine interactions across the frontiers (both cultural and geographical) that distinguished Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in the early modern period. This will include interactions within Europe, including Iberia, and between Europe and the Ottoman Empire during the "Renaissance" and "Reformation." Particular attention to travel literature, polemical literature, and implicit intellectual exchanges. Sources in English translation. Term paper. Students taking the seminar at the 5000 level will be expected to do some work on primary sources in original languages. [PIN code required; 10 max enrollment]

UCB Jewish Studies Spring 2014 Courses

Comparative Literature
Gender and Identity in Modern Jewish and Israeli Drama (Comp Lit 155/S. Aronson-Lehavi)
This course will provide an introduction to constitutional law using Israel as a case study. Topics include: Constitutionalism and judicial review, state neutrality and self-determination, minority rights, state and religion, Human Rights Law, the concept of "defensive democracy" and ban of non-democratic political parties, legal aspects of the fight on terror, freedom of expression, equality and anti-discrimination, social rights, and constitutional limitations on privatization.

German
Yiddish Literature and Culture in Translation (German 168/Ingalls)
Introduction to the development of Yiddish literature from the start of the modern period, with particular emphasis on the global flourishing of the language of Ashkenazi Jews from the mid-19th century until the Nazi genocide and its aftermath. Works include a wide range of fiction, essays, political tracts, journalism, radio, photography, music, and theatrical and film performance.
              
Hebrew
Elementary Hebrew (Hebrew 1B/C. Boyarin)

Intermediate Hebrew (Hebrew 20B/R/ Adler)

Advanced Hebrew (Hebrew 100B/R. Adler)

Post-Biblical Hebrew Texts (Hebrew 120B/C. Boyarin)
I Want to Mix Up the Bible: The Work of Yehuda Amichai (Hebrew 104B/C. Kronfeld)
A close reading of the poetry and short stories of Yehuda Amichai (1924-2000), Israel's leading poet and an internationally prominent literary figure. The course will focus on Amichai's engagement with issues that range from contemporary politics to ethics and aesthetics through a sustained poetics of radical allusion to the Bible. Collaborative work will be encouraged. Taught in Hebrew.

History
History of the Holocaust (History 178/Efron)
This course will survey the historical events and intellectual developments leading up to and surrounding the destruction of European Jewry during World War II. We will examine the Shoah (the Hebrew word for the Holocaust) against the backdrop of modern Jewish and modern German history. The course is divided into two main parts: (1) the historical background up to 1939; and (2) the destruction of European Jewry, 1939-1945.
        
Jewish Studies
Jewish Storytelling (Jewish Studies 101/M. Wasserman):
We will study the stories Jews have told about who they are, where they come from, and what is most important. Examining the role of storytelling in the creation and perpetuation of Jewish identities from the Bible to Broadway, students will be introduced to the broad sweep of Jewish history, and to important religious and cultural expressions of Jewish life throughout the ages.  Completion of this course is a required prerequisite for award of the Minor in Jewish Studies.

Jewish Law (Jewish Studies 120; Law 265/K. Bamberger)
This course in Jewish Law and Ethics will take a comparative approach to conceptions of law, ethics, and the legal enterprise. By exploring a legal system that adopts a very different notion of the relationship between law and ethics, the course will offer a lens to reflect on the U.S. legal system, as well as the system of regulating the ethics and behavior in the legal profession.  The course will address foundational questions about the relation between law and ethics, the advocacy system and its alternatives, the benefits and disadvantages of basing law on notions of rights as opposed to obligations, legal evolution in the face of change, the role of narrative in law and ethics. It will consider a variety of substantive legal areas to illuminate overarching themes, including: Jewish law regarding speech, education, environmental protection, and abortion.  Assigned readings are all in English.  Undergraduate admission with permission of the instructor.

Topics in Modern Jewish Thought

Duarte De Oliveira, UCB
Course ID: NEAR EASTERN STUDIES 298 P 003 SEM   Thursdays, 2PM-5PM   Location: 275 Barrows   Units/Credit: 1-4

This graduate seminar aims to analyze crucial issues that have characterized the development of Jewish thought in the Modern and Contemporary periods. From Baruch Spinoza and Moses Mendelssohn, to Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber and Rav Kook, and more recently, from Richard Rubenstein, Eliezer Berkowitz, Abraham Heschel and Irving Greenberg, to Yeshayahu Leibowitz, David Hartman and Émmanuel Lévinas, we will delve into selected aspects of the work of these thinkers, as they confronted an ever changing world, facing the challenges that secularization, Zionism, the Holocaust and the State of Israel brought into Jewish life.

Legal Studies
Comparative Constitutional Law: The Case of Israel (Legal Studies 174/ S. Aronson-Lehavi)
In this course we will discuss dramatic works by Jewish and Israeli playwrights, authors, and performance artists, in which relations between gender, religion, and cultural identity are explored. By engaging with performance theory we shall discuss topics such as gender and ethnicity, feminism and religion, identity politics in historical and contemporary contexts, and performance as a vehicle for exploring self-identity. In order to discuss plays which conflate gender and questions of modern Jewish identity, the course will contextualize the plays with various modes of representation, examining the relations between the dramatic styles which are employed and the social questions that are negotiated through the plays. These modes of representation include realistic drama (and the critique of realism); documentary drama; epic and Brechtian drama; Écriture féminine; solo performance, and performance-art. Authors include: Orly Castel-Bloom, Anna Deveare-Smith, Yosefa Even-Shoshan, Etgar Keret, Tony Kushner, Deb Margolin, Tamar Raban, Paula Vogel, Rina Yerushalmi, and Wendy Wasserstein. Classes will be accompanied by DVD recordings of many of the plays we discuss. All readings are in English.

Yiddish
Intermediate Yiddish (Yiddish 102/Chaver)
Further intensive study of Yiddish for advanced students, building on the foundation established in Yiddish 101, or equivalent knowledge. Advanced grammar and introduction to the reading of original texts.
 

Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy & Society Spring 2014 Courses

Gender and Identity in Modern Jewish and Israeli Writing (COMP LIT)
Sharon Aronson-Lehavi, Senior Lecturer of Theatre and Performance Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Bar Ilan University Lisa and Douglas Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society

Holy Theatre: Medieval and Modern Paradigms (THEATRE)
Sharon Aronson-Lehavi, Senior Lecturer of Theatre and Performance Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Bar Ilan University Lisa and Douglas Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society

Comparative Constitutional Law: The Case of Israel (UNDERGRADUATE LEGAL STUDIES)
Amnon Lehavi, Atara Kaufman Professor, Radzyner School of Law, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya; The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation Visiting Professor of Israeli Law and Society, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society

Jewish Law (LAW/JEWISH STUDIES)
Kenneth Bamberger, Professor of Law, Berkeley Law Faculty Director, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society

CJS Fall 2013

History Methodology Seminar
Dr. Deena Aranoff, Graduate Theological Union & Christopher Ocker, San Francisco Theological Seminary & Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: HS-6025               Monday, 2:10PM-5:00PM                  Location: Hedco at GTU

This course will survey a variety of historical methodologies as they are commonly applied to the study of Christianity and Judaism. The seminar will pay particular attention to current scholarship and works of ongoing methodological importance. It will also refer to works of previous generations which have formed the background of current cultural-historical study of Christianity and Judaism. Seminar required of GTU doctoral students in history and expected of doctoral students in other areas declaring history as an allied field.

Jewish Biblical Hermeneutics
Dr. Deena Aranoff, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: HSHR-3741         Tuesday, 9:40AM-12:30PM               Location: CDSP 113

This course will examine the primary modes of Jewish Biblical hermeneutics since antiquity: rabbinic midrash, hellenistic variations, medieval grammatical interpretation, philosophical allegory, the mystical hermeneutics of medieval kabbalists, Hasidic homily, feminist approaches, pre-modern translations and Spinoza. In addition to attaining an understanding of these interpretive trends, we will examine the paradoxical function of the Bible as a site for innovation as well as conservation. One year of Hebrew language study is required.

Jewish Perspectives on Suffering & Life
Dr. Zvi Bellin- Ph.D., LPCC
Course ID: PS-2126                Wednesday, 12:40PM-3:30PM                      Location: CDSP 113

This course will explore the intersection between the experience of suffering and the search for personal meaning through a variety of Jewish pastoral perspectives. We will begin our course by exploring what a Jewish pastoral framework might look like and why it is a valuable approach in the study of Jewish text and life. Each week will focus on different views on the nature of suffering and life meaning from the relational to the communal to the liturgical. This course will expose you to selections from the Hebrew Bible and Talmudic tales that explore the main themes of the course. We will encounter the writings of Viktor Frankl, Martin Buber, the Warsaw Ghetto Rabbi (Rabbi Kalonymus Kalman Shapira), Rabbi Alan Lew, and other Jewish thinkers. This course will be geared towards students who will be applying the knowledge gained in academic and/or ministry settings.

Jews in the Modern World
Dr. Shaina Hammerman, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: HSHR-2026                       Monday, 9:40AM-12:30PM                 Location: Hedco at GTU

This course will examine the phenomena and processes of Jewish modernization, including the Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), Hasidism, Socialism, Zionism, anti-Semitism, and the construction of a Jewish historical narrative. We will explore historical documents, historiography, literature, film, and other new media as we consider how Jews define themselves and are defined by others in the modern period.  This course fulfills the M.A. and Certificate requirements for the second half (modern-contemporary) of the year-long survey course in Jewish history and thought. Reader  responses, presentations, and research paper.

Jewish Identity & Race
Elizabeth Ingenthron, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: HRHS-2034                     Thursday, 9:40AM-12:30PM              Location: Hedco at GTU

Race as a category is one that has changed in meaning and application in the history of the United States and globally. Jewish identity in terms of race also entails a complicated history. By reading texts on critical race theories along with research which focuses on Jewish identity and race, we will consider the significance of race studies and Jewish studies in dialogue and find what emerges in terms of questions, problems and proposals for the future.

UCB FALL 2013 COURSES

History 175B (Efron): Modern Jewish History

Jewish Studies 39H (Rosenblatt): Freshman/Sophomore Seminar:
"The Paradox of Survival: An Introduction to Modern Jewish Thought"
Jewish thought since the Eighteenth Century is characterized by a commanding paradox. Whereas the Jews' entry into the modern world has witnessed their increasing secularization, Jews have, at the same time, been preoccupied with the relevance and significance of their ancient tradition. This introductory course will examine how a variety of modern Jewish thinkers have constructed and radically re-¬‐evaluated Jewishness in the light of modern experience. We will consider significant philosophers, novelists and poets and their understandings of concepts of the self, nation, history, and knowledge in relationship to their reconstruction of Jewish concepts such as justice, redemption, the stranger, holiness, exile and the Land of Israel.

L&S 120 (Hendel): The Bible in Western Culture
The ways that people understand the Bible are deeply linked with their ways of understanding and living in the world. We will explore the changes in biblical interpretation over the last two thousand years as a key to the shifting horizons of Western culture, politics, and religion. Topics will range widely, from the birth of the Bible to ancient heresies to modern philosophy, science, and literature. This will be a genealogy of western thought as it wrestles with its canonical text.

Jewish Studies 120 (Zaban): "Major Way Stations in Modern Hebrew Literature"
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the major works of Modern Hebrew literature while exploring their historical and cultural background. The course will highlight themes such as Zionism, the negation of the Diaspora, the Israeli-Arab conflict, the literary response to the Holocaust, individualism vs. collectivity, gender & sexuality and ethnic tensions. Readings will consist of novels, short stories and poems in English translation

Music 74/139 (Spagnolo): Music in Israel
A wide-angled perspective on the different cultures voiced through music in Israel, including traditional, popular and art music, with a specific focus on the role of music in the formation of Jewish national culture in the Middle East from the end of the 19th century to the present. Jews who immigrated to Palestine from the four corners of the world brought with them a host of diverse musical cultures, many of which had never come in contact with one another before. These diverse worlds of sound developed through the 20th century, sharing common traits and joining (and clashing) in shaping “Israeliness.” As heard in Israel, “world music” appears under an unexpected and intriguing light. The study of this complex musical universe requires historical, musicological and anthropological tools.

Near Eastern Studies 139 (Kronfeld, Levin): Multiculturalism in Modern Jewish Literatures
This course will engage the diversity of voices in modern Jewish literatures, and the rich interplay between multiple languages and cultures which they express. We will focus on close reading of poems, short fiction and folklore, translated into English from Jewish languages such as Hebrew, Judeo-Arabic, Ladino, and Yiddish by authors of Eastern and Central European as well as Middle Eastern and North African extraction.

Near Eastern Studies 190 (Aronson-Lehavi): Contemporary Israeli Culture
This course will offer an overview of contemporary artistic creativity in Israel by studying works of worldly renowned Israeli authors and artists. The class will compare prominent works in drama, theatre, art, film and dance. It will foster an understanding of contemporary Israeli arts and culture and will focus on the interrelations between the universal and local dimensions of these works. Themes include representations of the Holocaust; religious and secular identities; intergenerational relations; immigration; individualism and collectivism; militarism and war; and feminist identities. All texts will be available in English.

Near Eastern Studies 190C (Duarte de Oliveira): Jewish Thought, Culture and Civilization
This course aims to study one of the civilizations that deeply marked and inspired Western culture. The Jewish tradition, one of the cornerstones of European and American culture, belongs to the group of ancient cultures originated in the Fertile Crescent, which throughout time crystallized in evolving oral and written references, around which fundamental moments of the relation between God and Humanity have been condensed and preserved. In this introductory course we will delve into the thought of Jewish authors that dedicated themselves to the study of their tradition in a particularly creative mode. Following a brief historical introduction to the socio-cultural context of Jewish life in the Biblical, Post-Exile and Second Temple periods, we will approach moments and topics considered crucial for the development of this living tradition.

Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies 39D (Aronson-Lehavi): Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: "Representations of the Holocaust in Theater"
This course deals with the challenge of representing and performing Holocaust-related materials in contemporary theater and with the ways in which such materials have been used to explore complex questions of the past and the present. We will study plays and theatre performances that employ experimental, thought-provoking, and often unsettling modes of representation in order to create powerful theatrical experiences, and analyze the aesthetic, social, and ethical issues that such performances evoke. The course will also engage with theories of documentary theatre, total theatre, cultural memory as performance, trauma and performance, and relations between the arts and the Holocaust more generally.

Yiddish 103 [German Dept] (Chaver): Topics in Yiddish Literature
Topic: Yiddish Literature in America.

Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society Fall 2013 Courses

Contemporary Israeli Culture (NES 190)
Sharon Aronson-Lehavi, Senior Lecturer of Theatre and Performance Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Bar Ilan University
Lisa and Douglas Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: Representations of the Holocaust in Theatre (THEATRE 39D)
Sharon Aronson-Lehavi, Senior Lecturer of Theatre and Performance Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Bar Ilan University
Lisa and Douglas Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor, Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israeli Law, Economy and Society
 
Music in Israel (MUSIC 74/139)
Francesco Spagnolo
Curator, Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life, UC Berkeley
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar: The Paradox of Survival: An Introduction to Modern Jewish Thought
Eli Rosenblatt, Graduate Student in Modern Jewish History, UC Berkeley

CJS Spring 2013

Reading Rabbinic Texts: Negotiating Theory and Practice
Dr. Dina Stein, Koret Visiting Professor in Rabbinics & Folklore
Course ID: HRHS-5200  Tuesday, 9:40AM-12:30PM        Location: MUDD 101

The course will provide an overall view of rabbinic literature - its main compositions and its literary - hermeneutic genres. It will also address possible historical contexts that may have informed it. Special attention will be given to the role Midrash plays in the rabbinic corpus as an underlying principle.

Jewish Folklore
Dr. Dina Stein, Koret Visiting Professor in Rabbinics & Folklore
Course ID: RSHR-4915    Wednesday, 9:40AM-12:30PM    Location: MUDD 101

What constitutes "Jewish Folklore"? What is (Jewish) folklore in the Bible, in Rabbinic literature, in medieval texts and in modern times? The definition of folklore involves cultural and textual assumption which in turn yield a variety of historical reconstructions. The course will address theoretical issues pertaining to the notion of folklore while focusing on specific texts from different periods, mainly rabbinic. 

Ancient-Medieval Jewish Civilization
Dr. Deena Aranoff, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: HSST-2022    Thursday, 9:40 AM-12:30 PM            Location: Hedco at GTU

This course will examine Jewish civilization from its beginnings in ancient Israel through its development in medieval times. We will examine features of Jewish communal life, as well as the intellectual and religious currents among Jews in the ancient and medieval periods. This course will provide an understanding of the continuities and discontinuities in Jewish history and the overall process of cultural change in Judaism. This course is required for all M.A. and Certificate students at CJS. Weekly response papers/Final Exam.

Jewish Mysticism
Dr. Deena Aranoff, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: HRHS-5402    Monday, 9:40 AM-12:30 PM        Location: Hedco at GTU

This course will examine the ideas, narratives, theologies and practices that have been part of Jewish mysticism throughout the ages. We will proceed chronologically and thematically, exploring the variety of Jewish mystical trends as well as themes such as language, hermeneutics, gender, sexual imagery, nomian and antinomian aspects, messianism, symbolism and practices. We will consider the relationship between Jewish mysticism and surrounding religious systems as well as relationships between Jewish mysticism and other Jewish communal and rabbinic structures. Doctoral level seminar; at least year of Jewish studies required. Weekly Response Papers/Final Paper.

Levinas
Dr. Naomi Seidman, Graduate Theological Union
Course ID: CEPT-5410    Wednesday, 9:40 AM-12:30 PM        Location: Hedco at GTU

This course will explore the major writings of Emmanuel Levinas, with a special focus on the philosophical context of his work. Thus, the course will begin with a study of Husserl, Heidegger, and Rosenzweig’s phenomenological and existentialist writings. The last few sessions will be devoted to Levinas's writings on Jewish themes. Doctoral level seminar; preparation in Jewish Studies and/or philosophy required. Weekly response papers/final paper.

Additional Jewish Studies Courses at the GTU

Ancient Themes/Modern Images
Rene’e Powell, MA Jewish Studies, Center for Arts & Religion
Course ID: RA-1957        Friday, 12:40 PM-3:30 PM             Location: MUDD 102

This course explores Jewish artists from different historical periods and geographic locations. Students will examine how religious, cultural and social changes within the context of Jewish history have been expressed through visual representation. Our study will include analysis of complex issues of Jewish identity in relation to Jewish art, such as the impact of assimilation, anti-Semitism, and religious and political persecution. Particular attention will be paid to the question of why several Jewish artists, such as Lieberman, Rothko, Newman and Chagall chose to portray Jesus in their painting. This is a seminar with weekly discussions, which will require active participation and a few short reflection papers. [Auditors with Faculty permission]

CJS students can register with C.A.R.E (Center for Art and Religion)


 


Fall Courses-2012

REEL JEWS – IN AMERICAN MEDIA

Shaina Hammerman, PhD candidate, Graduate Theological Union

Monday, 6:00 PM-9:00 PM

Location: Hedco

Course ID: TBD

This course is devoted to an analysis of Jewish imagery in television, film, and the internet. We will examine the multiple meanings behind codes of Jewish (in)visibility often taken for granted by American artists and audiences. Students will: 1) follow the history of Jewish representation and involvement in creating popular visual media, 2) develop the skills to deconstruct images looking at everything from camera angles to costume to casting choices, 3) question the impact of visual media on perceptions of Jews as well as how Jewish identities are shaped by the pervasive use of their images. We will also address broader questions in current scholarship: the limits of representation; the formation of stereotypical identities through visual media; and how the status of "otherness" helps shape a "national" imagery. Reader responses and research paper.

 

THE CRAFT OF CRITICAL PROSE

Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture, Graduate Theological Union

Tuesday, 9:40 AM-12:30 PM

Location: MUDD 206

Course ID: IDS-5030

This course is intended for doctoral & advanced (thesis-level) MA students who are interested in working on their critical prose skills. Weekly writing assignments. Workshop-style class format. Students will work on a publishable essay or conference presentation in the last four weeks of the class. Topics include: crafting & supporting an argument, finding a voice, oral presentation techniques, & proper format. [12 max enrollment; Auditors excluded.]

 

MODERN JEWISH THOUGHT

Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture, Graduate Theological Union

Monday, 2:10 PM-5:00 PM

Location: GTU-HEDCO

Course ID: HSST-2024

This course will explore the work of modern Jewish thinkers from Spinoza through Buber, Rosenzweig, Heschel, and Levinas, as well as such movements as Hasidism, Zionism, and feminism. This course satisfies the requirements of the Center for Jewish Studies MA & certificate survey course.

 

JEW IN MEDIEVAL SPAIN

Susan Aguilar, PhD candidate, Graduate Theological Union

Thursday, 9:40 AM-12:30 PM

Location: TBD

Course ID: HS-3737

This course examines the diversity of Jewish experience in Spain from the 7th through the 15th centuries, encompassing both its "Golden Age" and the Expulsion. We will utilize a variety of readings - from Maimonides to anonymous women poets - to interrogate the opposing concepts of "convivencia" and conflict popularly used to describe the Sephardic experience. Seminar: short papers; final paper. All readings in English.

 

Spring Courses-2012

 

MEDIEVAL JEWISH PHILOSOPHY

Deena Aranoff, Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union

Tuesday, 9:40AM-12:30PM     

Location: Graduate Theological Union (HEDCO Room)  

Course ID: HSHR-5190

This course will examine Jewish philosophical trends from the tenth through the fifteenth centuries. We will examine the Aristotelian and neo-Platonic trends that were prominent in the Islamic cultural context and the ways in which these notions profoundly shaped the Jewish ideas of the period. Some questions that will emerge as part of our studies are: What is the definition of Jewish philosophy? What kinds of questions occupied Jewish philosophers in the medieval period? How did religion and philosophy combine to address these questions and how did they clash? How did Jewish thinkers reconcile reason with revelation? The course will also examine the impact of philosophical notions upon two significant aspects of Jewish intellectual life: mysticism and Biblical hermeneutics.

 

POLITICS OF BIBLE TRANSLATION

Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture, Graduate Theological Union

Monday, 2:10PM-05:00PM     

Location: Graduate Theological Union (HEDCO Room)   

Course ID: HSHR-4531

This course will explore the history of Bible translation from antiquity to our own day, focusing on translation as political and cultural, as well as linguistic negotiation. Our goals will be to understand the historical emergence of major Bible translations and to acquire methodological tools drawn from translation studies to enable us to analyze these translations. Seminar/paper [Auditors with Faculty permission]

 

INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM

Deena Aranoff, Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union

Tuesday, 12:40PM-03:30PM     

Location: Pacific School of Religion (Mudd 102) 

Course ID: HSHR-2020

This course will examine the historical development of Judaism, its canonical texts, practices, calendar, and culture. We will survey important features of Biblical and rabbinic literature, Jewish mystical and philosophical traditions, as well as aspects of modern Jewish culture. Short paper/exam.

 

INTRODUCTION TO TALMUD AND RABBINIC THOUGHT: LAW, POLITICS, THEOLOGY

Noah Greenfield, PhD candidate, Joint Doctoral Program in Jewish Studies

Thursday, 9:00PM-12:00PM     

Location: Church Divinity School of the Pacific (room-113)  

Course ID: HSHR-2015   

The exciting field of rabbinics has been energized in the last few decades by cultural studies, literary, gender, post-colonial and various other critical theories. This course will consider the fruits of these projects within a framework in which rabbis have been neglected: the history of ideas. How can the rabbis be studied for their thought? In what way have they and can they contribute to theories of justice, politics and religion? This course will expose students to a wealth of primary rabbinic texts (in translation) and seminal theoretical sources which shed light on them.

Fall Courses-2011

JEWISH BIBLICAL HERMENEUTICS

Deena Aranoff, Graduate Theological Union

Tuesday, 12:40PM-03:30PM     

Location: Church Divinity School of the Pacific (room-116)  

Course ID: HSHR-3741

This class will explore the variety of Jewish Biblical interpretive traditions. We will examine Hellenistic, Rabbinic (legal and homiletic), philosophical, mystical, Hasidic, modern-critical and poetic readings of the Bible. One year of Hebrew advised. Seminar/paper. 

 

METHODS: JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN HISTORIES

Deena Aranoff, Graduate Theological Union

Christopher Ocker, San Francisco Theological Seminary and Graduate Theological Union

Monday, 9:40AM-12:30PM

Location: HEDCO Room

Course ID: HS-4125

This course will introduce a variety of historical methodologies as they are commonly applied to the study of Christianity and Judaism.  The seminar will pay particular attention to current scholarship and works of ongoing methodological importance. It will also refer to works of previous generations which have formed the background of current cultural-historical study of Christianity and Judaism. The course will survey varieties of cultural history and social history in the medieval period, before turning to the more thematic study of the concepts space and time in the history of Judaism and Christianity, with examples drawn from medieval and early modern Europe. Finally, the course will provide a forum for student research on conceptions, experiences, and formations of space and/or time in a period, religion or social group most relevant to the interests of each student.   PhD level course; seminar paper.

 

ISSUES IN MODERN JEWISH HISTORY

Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture, Graduate Theological Union

Monday, 12:40-3:30     

Location: HEDCO Room  

Course ID:HSHR-2026  

This course will explore major issues in modern Jewish history, examining as well the rise of Jewish historiography and approaches to the writing of Jewish history. We will focus, in particular, on the origins and character of Jewish modernity in its intersections with Jewish memory and history.

This course fulfills the MA in Jewish Studies requirement for a survey course in modern Jewish history or thought.

 

LITERARY THEORY AND JEWISH STUDIES

Naomi Seidman, Graduate Theological Union

Tuesday, 9:40-12:30     

Location: Graduate Theological Union (HEDCO Room) 

Course ID: HRHA-4000

This class will provide a survey of the major developments in literary theory in the twentieth century, beginning with Saussure and Russian Formalism and continuing with New Criticism, Structuralism and Post-Structuralism, Foucault, Queer Theory, Marxism and Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Post-colonialism, and beyond. While the bulk of our work will be in reading these texts, we will occasionally read Jewish Studies critics whose work is in dialogue with these theorists, to explore promising overlaps and significant intersections and applications of literary theory for Jewish Studies.


 

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For more information call 510-649-2482
email: cjs@gtu.edu