Graduate Theological Union

BCARS | Black Church/Africana Religious Studies

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The James A. Noel Symposium: Black Religion, Materiality, and the Atlantic World

Friday, September 30, 2016 - 9:00am to Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 1:00pm

Please join friends, colleagues, and former students of the late Rev. Dr. James A. Noel, Ph.D. for an academic symposium discussing the four key issues of the African-American experience that shaped his work.

James Anthony Noel (1948-2016): Prophet, Pastor, Professor, and Painter

The Graduate Theological Union mourns the loss of the Rev. Dr. James Noel, a cherished member of the GTU community who died on Sunday, January 31, 2016. An alum of both SFTS (MDiv, 1975) and the GTU (PhD, 1999), Dr. Noel was the H. Eugene Farlough, Jr. Chair of African American Christianity and Professor of American Religion at San Francisco Theological Seminary, served on the GTU's core doctoral faculty, and was convener of the GTU's Black Church/Africana Studies Certificate Program.

Womanist Symposium 2015

Saturday, January 10, 2015 - 8:00am

"But Who Do You Say I Am?" is the theme for the GTU's third annual womanist symposium at American Baptist Seminary of the West, 2606 Dwight Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. Keynote speaker will be Rev. Dr. Linda E. Thomas, professor of theology and anthropology at Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. Respondents and panelists for the day includes Dr. Valerie Miles Tribble, Dr. Jacqueline Thompson, Rev. Sandra Blair, Rev. Dr.

Second Annual Womanist Symposium in January 2013

The Graduate Theological Union, San Francisco Theological Seminary, and McGee Avenue Baptist Church in Berkeley are teaming up to offer the second annual Womanist Symposium entitled “But Who Do They Say I Am?”

The symposium will be held Saturday, Jan. 12, at McGee Avenue Baptist Church, 1640 Stuart Street, Berkeley, from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Womanist Symposium - "But Who Do They Say I Am?"

Saturday, January 12, 2013 - 8:00am to 3:30pm

McGee Avenue Baptist Church, 1640 Stuart Street, Berkeley

The Womanist Symposium's Mission Statement is to be a prophetic voice, concerned about the entire African American community. The central point is to equip and energize Black women to become knowledgeable and confident in expressing their lived experiences, and Christian faith tradition by challenging all oppressive forces that impede the freedom of Black women to live positively and productively.

VIDEO: Black Religion in the Atlantic World During the Age of Revolution: Excavating the Sublime

Distinguished Faculty Lecture, November 8, 2012

James Noel, H. Eugene Farlough, Jr. Chair of African American Christianity and Professor of American Religion, San Francisco Theological School.

Respondent: Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture and Director of the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union.

Colloquium Series

Each year, the BC/ARS Steering Committee will present a Colloquium Series revolving around issues related to BC/ARS that will be open to the GTU, UCB, and the public.   The Colloquium Series may consist of a number of lectures, forums, seminars, or a conference.  Each of these events will present significant recent scholarship on Black Church/Africana Religious Studies. Speakers will be drawn from the GTU and UCB communities and from beyond.

Faculty Resources

Rev. Dr. Dorsey Blake (PSR, Visiting Associate Professor of Pastoral Leadership and Social Transformation)

Rev. Dr. Ronald Burris (ABSW, Associate Professor of Church History)

Rev. Dr. Laurie Garrett-Cobbina (SFTS, Shaw Family Chair for Clinical Pastoral Education)

Black Church/Africana Religious Studies

The Black Church is but one expression of the broader phenomenon of African American Religion. Spatially, the phenomenon of African American Religion encompasses West Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America and North America. Temporally, the phenomenon emerges in the sixteenth century and continues into the present.

The nature of African Americans’ religious experience can be better understood when the Black Church is situated within this broader spatial/temporal framework.

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