Graduate Theological Union

Culture

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Culture and Dignity: Dialogues Between the Middle East and the West

Thursday, December 6, 2012 - 7:30pm

by Professor Laura Nader

presented by UC Berkeley’s International House

UC Berkeley International House, Auditorium, 2299 Piedmont Avenue, Berkeley

God in the White House: Religion and the 2012 Election

Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 7:00pm

We will explore the Christian, Mormon, Muslim and Jewish perspectives on the upcoming election and the role of religion in American politics, with attention to recent discussions around the separation of Church and State, on religious freedom and its role in public policy, and U.S. foreign policy.

Speakers:

Cross-Cultural Lens: Using multicultural theory to interpret Jesus

Kayko Driedger Hesslein’s daily life is both multicultural and multireligious: she is Canadian of Japanese and German descent and Lutheran. Her husband is both American and Jewish. Her two children have inherited all of these identities. Both as a pastor and as someone diving more deeply into theology, she has been trying to develop a language that explained her and her family’s multiplicious identities on a theological level.

“Who Do They Say I Am?”

On Saturday, January 14, the Black Church/Africana Religious Studies Program hosted a Womanist Symposium – “Who Do They Say I Am?” at the McGee Avenue Baptist Church in Berkeley. The Honorable Congresswoman Barbara Lee, 9th Congressional District, was the morning keynote speaker.

Interreligious Studies at the GTU

Something new is happening at the GTU: a new M.A. area of concentration in Interreligious Studies (IR) will begin in fall 2012. Applications are due February 1 for the first class of students.

Exploring Expressions of Orthodox Judaism

It was standing room only in Easton Hall for the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies' lively November 29 conference “Formations of Orthodoxy,” which explored Orthodox Jewish cultural formations in interwar Poland and post-Holocaust America.
The evening ended with a keynote talk by Rabbi Michael Schudrich, Chief Rabbi of Poland.

GTU hosts delegation from China

On Saturday, October 8, the GTU Asia Project was pleased to welcome thirteen distinguished Christian leaders from the People’s Republic of China. The group had come to the U.S. to attend a Bible exhibition in Washington, D.C. and to visit theological seminaries in Pittsburgh, Atlanta, and Los Angeles before coming to the GTU. A welcoming reception and roundtable conversation was hosted by GTU Dean Arthur Holder, Professor Thomas Cattoi from the Jesuit School of Theology, GTU Ph.D. students Pui Fong Wong and Mary Mee-Yin Yuen, and CDSP D.Min. student Chun Wai Lam.

Called to Blessings

“I will not pick up hammer and nails and
participate in this crucifixion.”

— Ruth Meyers, Hodges-Haynes Professor of
Liturgics, Church Divinity School of the
Pacific and GTU Core Doctoral Faculty
Member

Jewish Studies Students Back from Poland

“I WENT TO POLAND to research the reputation of Yiddish writer Sholem Asch (1880-1957). Conversations with scholars in Warsaw and Krakow led me to Kutno, Asch’s birthplace, where I discovered that a biennial festival is held to honor him. I was surprised to discover the extent of Asch’s literary reputation in Poland outside the Jewish community. His works were extensively translated into Polish and are still in print. He was the first Jew to receive the Order of Polonia Restituta (Order of Rebirth of Poland). “It was remarkable to discover that right now, in Poland, a new narrative of Jewish experience is being constructed — about the rich texture and communal life of the Jewish community 800 years before the horrific events of the 20th century. While we should not forget the events of World War II, the Holocaust is no longer the only lens for viewing the Jewish story in Poland.” — Alan Shore, Ph.D. student in Jewish History and Culture

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