Graduate Theological Union

Human Rights

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Noel named 2012 Distinguished Faculty Lecturer

Rev. Dr. James Noel, the H. Eugene Farlough, Jr. Chair of African American Christianity and Professor of American Religion at SFTS, will deliver this year's Distinguished Faculty Lecture on November 8. His lecture is entitled “Black Religion in the Atlantic World during the Age of Revolution: Excavating the ‘Sublime.’”

2012 Distinguished Faculty Lecture

Thursday, November 8, 2012 - 7:00pm

Dr. James Noel (SFTS), “Black Religion in the Atlantic World During the Age of Revolution: Excavating the ‘Sublime’”

Boyung Lee, 2012 Sarlo Excellence in Teaching Award Recipient

Boyung Lee, Associate Professor of Educational Ministries, Pacific School of Religion, is the Sarlo Excellence in Teaching Award Recipient for 2012Graduate Theological Union announced Pacific School of Religion Professor Boyung Lee as the 2012 recipient of its Sarlo Excellence in Teaching Award during its May Commencement ceremony. In response to accepting the award, Lee said, "Most of my teachings for doctoral students have been through special reading courses on postcolonial, poststructuralist, feminist or critical pedagogies and through my ongoing mentoring work for them, especially for students of color. I consider my mentoring work for students of color as important as my classroom teachings, and thus I have offered two workshops for women of color students during this academic year through the Women’s Studies in Religion Program."

Beyond Berkeley: Religion and Cultural Exchange

Courtney Bruntz came to the GTU unsure of exactly what direction she would take. “At that point I was really interested in interreligious work, but thought at some point I would focus solely on Buddhism and the religions of Asia. GTU was a really good place to start that process because of all the different member schools and centers of distinction.” Bruntz’s journey beyond her Lutheran upbringing in Nebraska began at the age of 19 when her sister got married. Her brother-in-law is a third generation Japanese American. She recalls that her brother-in-law’s grandmother kept initiating conversations on the wedding being interreligious and intercultural. “I hadn’t thought about the intersection of two cultures and faith traditions until then. That experience shaped my initial years at college.”

A Conversation with Kwok Pui Lan

A conversation co-sponsored by the Women's Studies in Religion, Asia Project at the GTU, and the Pacific, Asian, and North American Asian Women in Theology and Ministry (PANAAWTM) 2012 Annual Conference "Abundant Life and Unjust Prosperity."

“Who Do They Say I Am?”

On Saturday, January 14, the Black Church/Africana Religious Studies Program hosted a Womanist Symposium – “Who Do They Say I Am?” at the McGee Avenue Baptist Church in Berkeley. The Honorable Congresswoman Barbara Lee, 9th Congressional District, was the morning keynote speaker.

Violence against indigenous religions

Izak Lattu, a doctoral student in Interdisciplinary Studies, denounces changes by the Indonesian government which oppress practioners of indigenous religion.

"Although indigenous faiths such as Sunda Wiwitan, Kejawen and other forms of traditional beliefs represent local ways of addressing the Ultimate Reality, they nonetheless encounter discrimination on a political basis....

An irony to religious tolerance

Izak Lattu, doctoral student in Interdisciplinary Studies, explains how the actions of one Indonesian politician marks the exception to the general principle of religious tolerance in the country for which it is revered.

"It has been years of agony for GKI Taman Yasmin Protestant church congregation members as Bogor Mayor Diani Budiarto has defied a Supreme Court decision to allow them to attend Sunday mass in their place of worship.

Budiarto’s bureaucratic move reflects the failure of not only law enforcement in the city, but also of the country’s civil justice system....

E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation Supports Two Outstanding Students

Sean Gross and Sheri Prud’homme are grateful recipients of the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation scholarship — a two-year full tuition scholarship supporting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered persons of faith, or those endeavoring to insure faith communities’ understanding, affirmation, and inclusion of LGBT individuals. Both are 2nd-year Ph.D. students.

Violence doesn't have a religion

Izak Lattu, a doctoral student in Interdisciplinary Studies, speaks against acts of violence perpetrated in the name of religion.

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