Graduate Theological Union

Naomi Seidman

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CJS Director Seidman remembers her father who documented life in Warsaw ghetto

Recently, Naomi Seidman, Director of the Center for Jewish Studies, traveled to Warsaw in commemoration of the uprising and the publication of her father's diary into Polish. Upon her return, the j profiled the important work her father did. An excerpt follows:

“My father was the archivist of the pre-war Warsaw Jewish community,” Seidman said in an interview. “He wrote in Polish, Hebrew and Yiddish, and was a Ph.D. of Jewish history.”

Seidman travels to Warsaw, home of her father and his diary

Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture and Director of the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies, received an invitation to Warsaw by Anna Cialowicz, the Polish translator of Hillel Seidman's “Diary of the Warsaw Ghetto.” Hillel was a Jewish historian, Yiddish journalist, and community activist, in addition to being Naomi's late father. The diary will be published in Poland this spring, coinciding with the seventieth anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, the largest Jewish revolt of World War II.

Naomi Seidman to Deliver Carleton College’s Forkosh Lecture in Judaic Studies

Naomi Seidman, a scholar who specializes in Jewish culture and literature, will deliver Carleton College’s annual Forkosh Family Lecture in Judaic Studies and Religion on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 7 p.m. in the Severance Great Hall. Entitled “The Marriage Plot: Sexuality, Secularization and the Emergence of Modern Jewish Literature,” Seidman’s lecture will explore how the secularizing trends of the 18th and 19th centuries worked through art and literature to influence Jewish sexual norms. This event is free and open to the public.

CIS and CJS Co-host Annual Madrasa-Midrasha Day of Learning on Jews and Muslims in the Media

Participants for the Center for Jewish Studies' and Center for Islamic Studies' annual Madrasa-Midrasha Day of Learning gathered at Easton Hall o

VIDEO: Black Religion in the Atlantic World During the Age of Revolution: Excavating the Sublime

Distinguished Faculty Lecture, November 8, 2012

James Noel, H. Eugene Farlough, Jr. Chair of African American Christianity and Professor of American Religion, San Francisco Theological School.

Respondent: Naomi Seidman, Koret Professor of Jewish Culture and Director of the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies, Graduate Theological Union.

Noel named 2012 Distinguished Faculty Lecturer

Rev. Dr. James Noel, the H. Eugene Farlough, Jr. Chair of African American Christianity and Professor of American Religion at SFTS, will deliver this year's Distinguished Faculty Lecture on November 8. His lecture is entitled “Black Religion in the Atlantic World during the Age of Revolution: Excavating the ‘Sublime.’”

2012 Distinguished Faculty Lecture

Thursday, November 8, 2012 - 7:00pm

Dr. James Noel (SFTS), “Black Religion in the Atlantic World During the Age of Revolution: Excavating the ‘Sublime’”

Naomi Sheindel Seidman

Graduate Theological Union
Koret Professor of Jewish Culture and Director of the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies
Core Doctoral Faculty Member

At GTU since 1995

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 1995
M.A., University of California, Davis 1984
B.A., Brooklyn College 1981

Exploring Expressions of Orthodox Judaism

It was standing room only in Easton Hall for the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies' lively November 29 conference “Formations of Orthodoxy,” which explored Orthodox Jewish cultural formations in interwar Poland and post-Holocaust America.
The evening ended with a keynote talk by Rabbi Michael Schudrich, Chief Rabbi of Poland.

Who among us is good? … and who is “us”?

Nargis Virani, Naomi Seidman, Arthur Holder, Munir Jiwa at the Western Wall in JerusalemLiterary critics and theologians often talk about "interpretive communities" and "capable readers." Who has the ability--and even the right--to interpret a text, especially a sacred text that bears authority in a particular religious tradition?

Last month I participated in a weeklong interreligious Theology Conference at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem along with Naomi Seidman (Director, Center for Jewish Studies), Munir Jiwa (Director, Center for Islamic Studies), and Nargis Virani (visiting faculty, Center for Islamic Studies). The theme of the conference was “What makes a good person?” Small groups involving participants from all three traditions studied key sacred texts together, working both in the original languages and in English translation.

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